About the incapacitation without tying up – we did a self defense unit in physical education my sophomore year of high school. Our instructor told us that if somebody came after you that you could cut their Achilles. I think his point was no Achilles = no walking on that leg. Not sure what you’d consider this, but that’s another way to stop somebody, especially if you want to get away

Sounds like the work of the same sadist who ran my first self defense class.

Okay,
so, there is a strand of thought in the self defense community that
says, “if someone comes after you; you fuck them up.” Usually,
these guys are adults, teaching other adults, and that’s fine. It’s a
philosophical outlook. You decide to make absolutely sure your attacker stays down. As an adult, you’re expected to
be able to weigh the consequences of your actions, look at the situation
you’re in, and respond appropriately.

They teach you to ramp up
to 10, and trust you to know when not to. So that, some day, if you run
into someone that requires that kind of a response, you can go there
immediately.

…and then, sometimes, guys who come from that strand end up in a classroom full of kids and everything goes to hell.

This
is where my outlook on unarmed combat comes from, if anyone was
wondering. A Wyoming Sheriff’s Deputy who probably should not have been
tapped to teach teens self defense.

Severing the Achilles tendon
is one of those injuries that will not heal on their own. If I’m
remembering correctly, the specific result is, you
cannot properly control the angle of your foot without the tendon.
Practically, this means no walking, no kicking, no use of the leg for
anything useful. This is an injury that will require surgery and, up to a
year of recovery time. This is very serious. Not life threatening, but (if untreated) it is permanent.

It’s
also not an injury you’d expect to see in a normal self defense
environment. Severing the tendon requires getting a blade in there. This
requires a very low strike (in the literal sense), because the tendon
is almost at ground level. You’re also hoping they’re not wearing
footwear that protects the ankle. Any self defense plan that stops if
your opponent is wearing a pair of boots, has some issues.

Actually,
I should clarify, it’s not an injury you expect to see intentionally
inflicted in a self defense situation. This does happen as a sports
injury, so this is something common enough that any doctor with a
history of dealing with sports medicine should know what to do. It is
also an injury that can occur when teaching martial arts. Not because
someone cut it, but because they misjudged a technique and tore their
own.

There is a related sword technique called hamstringing, where you cut the tendons at the back of the knee. Same basic result, except it’s their shin they can’t control, not their foot. Nasty, a little tricky to execute, but it does what it says. You’re slightly more likely to have a chance to go after that in a self defense situation, especially since very few people wear any armor there, but I still wouldn’t recommend it, because it’s exceedingly disproportionate.

Here’s the thing about this kind of self defense; It assumes you’ll use it in situations where the alternative is dying. Literally, if you didn’t do this, your attacker would have killed you, and you had no lesser option to save yourself.

Within that range, going after the Achilles tendon is kind of an odd choice. It’s not an easy target to nail. If you’re in some situation where it is available, and those kinds of extreme tactics are appropriate, then, sure. But there are far safer, and easier to exploit, options.

-Starke

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