Fight Write: The Only Unfair Fight Is the One You Lose (Part 1: The Nietzchean Defense)

This is going to be a rough ride for some of you, so we’re listing this with a trigger warning for violence. Fighting is very violent, any aspect of the human condition that deals with survival usually is. I believe it’s important for authors to be aware of the full brutality of combat so they can go in with their eyes open and taper back as they see fit. The only way to ever truly be in control of your story is when you have as much information about the subject matter as possible. This includes delving into some basic aspects of human psychology and how that affects combat. We’ll be breaking this article up into two to focus on two very important but different aspects of brutal combat.

“The only unfair fight is the one you lose.”

The first time I heard this phrase was in a self defense class when I was about twelve or thirteen. At the time, I’d come to fights with the idealistic belief that there was some kind of fair play involved in how to fight someone. There isn’t.

I’ve since heard the phrase from several former military men and a few cops. Here’s what it really means. You do whatever you need to, to survive a fight. In the real world, a lot of these moves have serious legal consequences, if they’re used outside of a life and death situation, and they probably should in your story as well.

The Psychology

The moves I’m going to talk about are both based on a simple psychological assumption. The idea is to look at people the same way you look at any other social animal. Then have your character present the illusion of being more of a monster than they actually are, in order to scare off aggressors.

This works with untrained thugs, bullies, and petty criminals. It will not work as well on characters who have extensive experience with combat and or the aftermath of violence.

The Eyes

Gouging out someone’s eyes is an excellent counter to choking. This is best achieved by gripping the skill with the thumbs next to the eye, and the index and middle finger near the ear, and pushing the character’s thumbs into their eyesockets.

Going for the eyes, before beginning the actual gouge, will usually evoke a very primal response and force a character to stop choking their victim while they try to deal with the gouger’s hands. Gouges can be done from behind, if the victim is being garroted or held, simply by having the victim reach over their head and behind them. Finally a successful gouge will make other combatants leery of closing in on the gouger for fear of joining the Blind Justice crowd.

Tooth and Claw: Biting vs. Scratching

The strongest muscles in your body are located just below your cheekbone. Regardless of if you believe if it was simple efficiency or divine inspiration, your mouth and teeth are designed to separate meat from, well, pretty much anything.

On the bright side, people are made mostly of meat, so, if it comes down to it, taking a chunk out of someone’s shoulder is just a new application of something you practice three times a day.

Forget zombies, the worst bite a human can suffer is from another human. Our mouths are loaded with bacteria that we’re used to, but other people… not so much. Even if your character doesn’t take a piece off, the injury will need actual medical attention, and explaining away a bite wound to a medical professional or a cop can be very difficult.

Additionally, depending on how you bite, your molars can apply enough force to crush some smaller bones; completely, and permanently, crippling their hand.

After biting off a chunk, your character’s going to want to spit it out, along with as much of the blood as possible. There are a lot of potential pathogens that can be spread from blood or tissue contact (off hand; some flavors of Hepatitis and of course HIV/AIDS are the two most dangerous possibilities) , so, your character is taking on a fairly serious health risk from chowing down. As with the eye gouge, this is going to make other attackers back off; with the logic of, “if she just bit off his fucking ear, what’s she going to do to me!?”

There’s also a pretty serious psychological block about going toe to toe with someone who’s covered in someone else’s blood. This is just as true of people attacking your character.

In contrast, scratching, and this is personal experience, just doesn’t seem to be that viable. You do some surface damage to the tissue, and you do get some skin samples, but it’s far more socially acceptable, and far less dangerous. It won’t have the psychological effect you want and can actually spur more aggression.

-Starke

Can you guys make a post about using a bow & arrow as a primary fighting weapon and its effectiveness in combat? Note: combat will not include modern weapons such as firearms or anything of the type.

We’re definitely going to do a primer on the bow, this will include both concerns for older styles of combat and modern ones since the weapon still has some very specific uses today and we don’t want to overlook those. We’ll put up an article for it in the next couple of days and one on ammo conservation/projectiles to cover all the bases.

Holy crap, guys!

Um, welcome! I’ve sort of been holding off welcoming new followers to this blog because we’ve been getting a steady stream over the past couple weeks and we’ve (Michi’s really) just sort of been staring at the screen in dumbfounded amazement. We’re nearly at 500 followers and given that we’ve only been doing this for three weeks or so, we can honestly say the success of this blog has surpassed our wildest dreams. No, really! Thank you!

We’re still figuring out the blogging thing, I (Michi) still don’t understand html, coding, and live in fear of the day I need to learn how to organize this thing. We’re working hard at creating posts for the queue since we’ll be moving soon in a few weeks and that may mean a few days of no internet. We’re also in the middle of trying to suss out the publishing industry, get a book published, and blocking out the next one. We’d do things like give-aways and we might in the future but right now Starke and I only have enough money for basic needs like food, shelter, paying off debt, and reference materials for our own writing (BOOKS!).

For the new followers, we usually post one article of our own a day and only reblog other articles that pertain to fighting, self-defense, writing about fighting, crafting fight scenes, and helping you guys craft awesome fighting mcbadasses.

Anyway, we’re so glad our information has been useful to so many of you! Welcome! If you have any questions or just want to party in our askbox, remember that it’s always open!

reference for writers: Writing Reference: Sprains and Strains

reference for writers: Writing Reference: Sprains and Strains

Tip: Your character can only strike in the directions their hips point.

Hand to hand combat is all about strategy, tactics, improvisation, and making the most of basic body mechanics. Yes, basic body mechanics. I’ve talked before about how the hips lead the body and they do. It’s not the arms or the shoulders or the legs, though each of the muscles has their place in making the body work. The hips are the guiding factor to creating momentum, the strength that comes from the pivot, the turning of the hips in conjunction with the upper and lower body to create force through movement. You create better results through conditioning the body and training your reflexes, but the limitations the body faces are its limitations.

 So, what are the directions you can strike in without stepping?

Forwards: front kick, roundhouse, shin kick, straight punch, cross, backhand, hammer fist, etc. Most of the basic strikes with the hands go straight forwards, the elbow can also strike going forward by coming across in a circular motion to strike at the face or the neck.

Side to side (right or left): The primary strikes on a sideways vector are the sidekick and the elbow. (Michi Note: Erp. I forgot the backhand, sorry.)

Backwards: the back kick, the mule kick, and other variations striking backwards (or with the fighter’s back to the opponent). Again: the elbow. The elbow is most useful for striking enemies from behind in close quarters, especially an enemy who is reaching in to grab them in a bear hug. Please keep in mind that the elbow is a close-quarters strike only, check it yourself by bending your arm at the elbow and bringing it across in front of your face. That’s the distance your character will have to strike effectively with the elbow, the elbow is the strike used when you are too close to get the windup for a punch to be effective. (Michi Note: my Divergent irritations are showing again, sorry.) Because of limited movement backwards, (yes, surprise! the joints betray us), the elbow is one of the most effective strikes from this direction. Strikes backwards are usually low (to the stomach) because visibility is either bad or non-existent, so the fighter is working off instinct. The stomach is a large, easy, soft target to aim for. (It’s not uncommon in the grab, if the arms are left free for a fighter to reach back over their head for their opponent’s eyes. Eye gouging is a thing, guys.)

It seems pretty limited when you stop and think about it. Forward, back, left, or right. Much of hand to hand and even basic weapons combat is all about maneuvering your opponent onto a vector they can’t strike from, while the protagonist is still able to strike them. This is both why stepping is important (focus on the feet). Now, it’s also important to remember that their opponent won’t want to go that way and may not be easily led. This is why stepping to get on diagonals or out of the way is important.

Always keep track of which directions all your characters in a scene are facing, what they want, where they are going, and what they are doing. It can be hard to visualize this and keep track, so always go back and double check (even triple check) that you didn’t accidentally magically move your characters to a different place just because they need to get hit on that line. Make sure the reader knows how they got from point A to point B to point C in the scene, even if the fighting itself is confusing for the characters.

Happy writing!

Fight Write: Your Character’s Weapon is also a Character

No, we’re not saying anthropomorphize your weapon. But here’s the thing, the best way to prove to your reader that your character knows what they’re doing isn’t what they do in the middle of a fight. It’s the behavior they exhibit outside of it, especially during their downtime.

Every weapon is unique and I don’t simply mean that in the way that a bastard sword and a broadsword are two completely different weapons. They may look almost the same, but when you look at them closely, you’ll notice many differences between them that are key to how they were used in combat. So make sure you know which weapon your character is using, calling it a sword or a gun is not good enough, know which one it is, what it was and is still used for, and how it works.

 Now, it’s even more important to mention that even weapons that are direct off the factory line like handguns and rifles are all individually unique. No gun, even of the same make and model, is exactly the same as another. Each has their own individual tics and flaws in their construction for how well they work and what needs to be done to care for them.

Handguns specifically are more subject to wear and tear because of their internal mechanisms and more personal customization. For example, the Walther P99 comes with three different grips designed for the shooter’s hand to be configured out of the box. If you add a tactical flashlight to the weapon, then you change its balance and recoil. This means the weapon will look and feel different from weapons of a similar make.

Any character who has had their weapon for a long period of time will know the ins and outs of it. They’ll have to. For a character that fights their weapon is their lifeblood, it’s their most precious possession, in some cases it’s essentially their best friend. Now, a character that doesn’t properly care for their weapon and ignores basic safety is a danger to themselves and those around them. But in fiction, that can definitely be a distinctive character trait to that character. This is why it’s so important for authors to get to know the weapons they plan on using, simply because then they’ll know what makes a good practitioner and what doesn’t so they can adjust the character’s behavior according to what they need for their story.

No matter what the weapon is, a character who is a warrior or who fights will be defined by how well they care for that weapon and their gear.   

Here are some ways a weapon can indicate a character’s state to the reader without any dialogue being necessary:

In the beginning of the story, Joe’s sword is pristine and in perfect condition, we constantly see him cleaning it and sharpening it after each battle as the novel progresses, Joe’s traveling companion Jason begins to notice small signs of wear in Joe based on the blood left on the hilt and that the annoying amount of time Joe spends cleaning his weapon is getting shorter and the blade is getting duller. The more battles there are and the worse it gets until Jason finally steps in to confront Joe about his behavior. This can lead to a moment of crisis for Joe that allows us to see into a character who wouldn’t normally converse about these emotions. The state of the weapon can also be used to show the reader, who may like Joe, that he’s not doing well and encourage emotional investment in his character because it’s obvious he’s having a difficult time.

In the hands of an aware author, this can be a way to humanize characters that are usually unlikeable without ever having to go inside their heads. You also can’t just take a character’s personal weapon from them and give them another with the expectation they’ll be interchangeable. Even a practitioner who is skilled with multiple different arts will have difficulty period adjusting a weapon they aren’t used to using. This is because every weapon is an individual and just like their wielder, should be a considered a character in their own right.

Ask yourself some important questions dealing with your weapon and your setting:

Is the weapon your character uses common in the setting they are living in?

If not and even if it is, where and who did they get it from?

How much effort will they have to put in to care for their weapon? If it’s a rare weapon or one that has fallen out of use, they may have to have some skills in basic chemistry to construct the gunpowder or the oils they’ll need.

Why do they use this weapon instead of another? Were they trained in its use or are they self-taught? If they did learn from someone, then who was it and who taught their teacher?

If it’s a projectile weapon is the ammunition for it readily available or will they have to manufacture it themselves? If you’re using a more exotic weapon like a matchlock or a flintlock pistol, this will be extremely difficult even if your character has the chemical understanding to manufacture the gunpowder because getting flint in the proper configuration will be a pain if it’s not readily available in the setting. Flint will wear down over time.

How durable is the weapon? Will it require a lot of special care? If your character is using a katana, it’s best to keep in mind that there is a significant difference between blades forged in Japan today and older blades made using the natural iron deposits found in Japan.  The older katanas are very rare because though they didn’t see a lot of use, they weren’t very durable. If it’s a different sort of bladed weapon, they’ll need something like a whetstone to be able to keep the weapon sharp and hammer out the inevitable dents the weapon will receive if there’s no blacksmith readily available. (You won’t be able to do this with any katana that pre-dates WWII. You may be able to hone one though, research as needed).

Is this a weapon that another trained practitioner or even local law enforcement will recognize? If yes, will carrying it get them into trouble with the local authorities? If not, why not? It’s important to remember that even today in states like California, the bow and crossbow are regulated weapons that require a permit to be purchased and owned legally. If your character is living under a restrictive regime, the number of weapons they will have access to and be able to effectively hide will be limited. So pick one that makes sense for the world they live in, not just their profession and their skill set.

Here are some ideas for how to include weapon cleaning scenes in a narrative:

You don’t need to take time out to specially point out that your character is doing this or make a big deal out of it. Besides, that would be strange for them since for most warriors these tics in behavior come naturally and are a package part of their training.

You can have them cleaning and caring for their weapon while they are in the middle of a conversation with another character if they are a center of that scene.

You can show them cleaning their weapon in the background of a tense conversation that they may be watching but doesn’t involve them.  It will only take a few lines to show what they are doing through other characters basic observation skills.

Sometimes, it’s important to show non-combat characters feeling threatened by the fact that they have the weapon out and annoyed by the fact that this character isn’t paying attention to them even though they are.

Depending on a character’s martial style, they may have an annoying habit of being up and mobile. They’ll pace, they’ll stretch, even just during normal conversation. Character A stretching can be very distracting for Character B if they are sexually attracted to them. It’s important to remember that stretching can be done in complete innocence or with the intention of arousal, depending on who the characters are and what their personality is.

Weapons are an easy source of tension because for many people who don’t fight (and even some who do) they are threatening. One of your characters may not even realize that the fact they have their rifle out and in pieces on the table with a loaded handgun right next to it might be perceived as a threat by another character. Or, the fact that they are cleaning their weapon could be a threat, such as sharpening their sword with a whetstone. It could be a way to indicate annoyance. So, think about where they lay out their weapon, what direction it’s facing, where they choose to look, and how fast they are going. A character’s body posture can communicate a lot without them ever having to say anything or it could suggest to the reader (and the other character if they’re good at reading body language) that they mean the opposite of what they are saying.

The time it takes for a character to get their weapon ready or put away can be a hindrance, especially if it’s a weapon like the bow where such action is necessary to maintain the battle-readiness of the weapon. This action can be used to cause narrative tension between those who just want to get on with it while the first character needs to make sure their weapon is prepared right.

Here’s an example of a good use of an exotic weapon in fiction and how it affects the character:

Marcus in Babylon 5 is an excellent example of how to make use of an exotic weapon in a narrative without it being either ostentatious or aggravating. In the show, Marcus carries an Mimbari fighting pike, which is an alien weapon carried by the race Humanity was at war with ten years before the series starts. It’s a rare weapon even among the Mimbari, used only by high ranking members of their warrior caste. In the weapon’s natural state it has the advantage of not looking like one. But even in combat, it’s a weapon that most people won’t recognize. The problem for him, though, is that veterans of the war will (and do in the show) recognize it as a Mimbari weapon and they react, often according to old prejudices. The weapon also puts him at odds with members of the Mimbari warrior caste when he encounters them because it’s offensive for him to be using one of their traditional weapons. It also means he was extensively trained in what his own people consider to be an alien fighting style and a fighting style used by the enemy. The people who see the weapon for what it is are left uncertain of where his loyalties lie and whether or not he can be trusted.

The pike serves as a method of showing to the audience how Marcus is a balance between the two races while also being isolated by it and pushed to the outside edge of both communities. It’s an excellent demonstration of what a weapon can mean for a character beyond them just carrying around a unique shiny that makes them special.

Every aspect included in your story must be there for a reason. This includes a character’s weapon.

MBC Guerrilla Video Volume 1: Concepts (by StaySafeMedia)

So, I’m posting another Michael Janich video. This one is about basic concepts that have to do with self-defense and his own personal style that bases itself in knife fighting.

I’m a big fan of self-defense training for everyone, but on a craft level for writers especially. The difference is that many martial artists will focus their training on how to do a technique and not the focus of what it’s for until after the student has developed a decent base. This is fine, even good, for martial artists because it’s a necessary step. But it can make researching MAs rather obtuse when trying to divine how it works without the necessary years of training. Practice for real world situations often won’t happen until the upper belt ranks and sometimes, not until black belt. For example, I didn’t start working knife disarms until I started training for my second degree black belt test at 15.

Compare to self-defense, where training focuses on techniques that can be picked up easily and puts a primer on user understanding. The focus is not just on how to do a technique, but what it is and what it does, how it can be used practically and with different variations. This is the sort of information a writer needs to be able to write about fight scenes well.

Also, studying up on body mechanics and basic physiology never hurts.

I’ll be posting an article of my own later today. If you have any questions either regarding writing or self-defense, our askbox is always open.

Fuck Yeah Character Development!: Profession v. Personality

Fuck Yeah Character Development!: Profession v. Personality

JUNKYARD AIKIDO: A Practical Guide To Joint Locks, Breaks, And Manipulations (by StaySafeMedia)

This is the last video I’m posting, but hopefully you’ll take a look. There’s a lot of overlap between self-defense training and writing about combat in learning simple basic techniques that you understand and can use effectively in multiple situations in both real life and on the page. Some of the best advice I have on writing fight scenes is very similar to the advice Janich puts out for self-defense. There’s also the added bonus of seeing a few techniques in action that will hopefully help you build better fight scenes.

I’ll be doing my own discussion of how joint locks work and how to write them in stories in the near future, but for now take a look at this video and the other videos I posted today to see if anything here may be helpful for you.

Remember, these are just bite size chunks from his full self-defense courses that are helpful to get you started. If you’re interested in more, you can check out his website and his other videos on Youtube.

Advice and suggestions for writing fight scenes.