Tag Archives: the only unfair fight

Hi, Aunty Scripty! Thanks for running this blog! It’s such an amazing resource, and I appreciate all the hard work you put into it! On to my question, my character is in a bad situation, and as a last resort, because his hands are bound behind his back, bites his attacker’s throat. Would it be possible for him to actually tear out his attacker’s throat with his teeth? Sorry that it’s such a gruesome ask! Thanks again!

scriptmedic:

Probably not, but it’s certainly worth trying.

The throat is pretty well protected. The skin is thick and tough, the trachea itself is made of hard cartilage rings, and it’s actually surprisingly difficult  for a human to get a good mouth-hold on another human’s neck. (If you have a significant other who is okay with this, give it a try; don’t actually bite down though).

Hunters who do the throat-ripping thing usually have longer mouths than we do, which helps them get a grip on their prey. Humans have fairly short mouths by comparison, and really aren’t evolutionarily adapted for this task.

Now, that is not to say that having a human try to rip out your throat is not an absolutely fucking terrifying thing, because it is, and flesh missing from the neck can be psychologically devastating even if it’s not actually physically lethal. Your character could probably significantly damage the musculature and the skin, and possibly cause a severe venous bleed from the external or internal jugular.

If your character is going to get any better of a bite than that they’ll need their hands to hold the neck in place while they bite.

(Also, bites in fights is proooobably more @howtofightwrite‘s territory much more than it is mine 😉 ).

Best of luck!

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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We’ve answered this kind of question before on several occasions, they’re in the biting and the only unfair fight tags. For a better exploration of this topic, read this ask answered by Starke about biting off fingers.

The short answer is that physically you certainly could take a good sized chunk out of their neck with your teeth (terrifying enough in and of itself), the problem is the psychology necessary to follow through with it. Biting is straight up nasty and, when it comes to other humans, runs up hard against a whole bunch of self-preservation instincts that any protagonist would need to fight past in order to pull it off.

More than that, with his hands bound he’d have no way to hold onto his opponent thus not enough time to get a good bite off. He’s got to get to them, lunge in fast enough to get his teeth around their throat or (possibly) lure them close enough to get the bite off, and hope they don’t stop his head with their hands (or head) before he gets there. Attacking the throat, even with the element of surprise, is a great way to get someone to guard it.

The truth is in the heat of battle you’re more likely to come up with
ramming your head into your attackers throat (more effective) to a
temporary stun, then follow up with a headbutt to their face or move on
to using your shoulders and legs before thinking of your teeth. (It’s
difficult, but you can kick with your hands tied behind your back.)
Strikes to the throat can crush or halt your ability to breathe entirely
with enough force, but are more often used as stunners, to distract via
fear (brain freak out, vital place has been attacked, internal screaming) and temporary loss of breath. These create what we call “openings” as in openings in defense.

As @scriptmedic says, the throat is
fairly well defended by your physiology.  This is going to be true of
the most obviously vital places.

You get far more mileage out of convincing someone they’re being attacked there in order to strike elsewhere because your instincts will move to defend those places at all cost. Like your hands automatically rising to your throat if it feels like someone is going to hit it. (This doesn’t make you good at blocking, it’s just instinctual order of operation. Sacrifice the less necessary body part for the essential one. This is why we never fight on instinct.)

And frankly, depending on his position, a fake out headbutt to the
throat while actually hitting the stomach (rising on that upward
diagonal into the diaphragm) will probably be more effective. Then, if
they’re still standing, headbutt to the face.

The first question is: can he bite?

No, really think about it. He cannot hesitate, not at all. A split second hesitation and he’s done for, he must complete the act in one simultaneous move. He can’t drop the moment he tastes the dirt and sweat coming with their flesh, then the blood running over his tongue, and get enough for a lethal rip away while his opponent is trying to get away. (And the attacker is, he started backing up the second the protagonist came at him, and the protagonist has no way to make him stand still.)
Remember, we humans don’t have the sharp teeth of a carnivore to sink in and keep our prey from running.

I mean it, spend some time thinking about what it’d feel like, taste like, and smell like. Then think about it from his perspective, it’s a dramatic idea but can he follow through?

The second question is: can he move in and bite in .5 seconds?

This is the sort of attack where he doesn’t get a second shot, and the kind where threat level is upgraded into automatic kill territory. Biting is socially unacceptable, dishonorable, and offensive.

The four scenarios for the victim are terrified enough to be paralyzed into inaction, terrified into action, so terrified they run, and righteously pissed. The protagonist has got to kill before fight, flight, or freeze takes effect. (And they can’t, really, unless they somehow manage to take out the carotid.)

The third question is: will the attacker be shocked enough by this bite to not retaliate while it’s happening?

The problem with the mechanics of a bite is you’ve got to get your teeth on the other guy’s throat for a solid rip away (and not miss because they moved their head or the teeth slip off), this takes time. The worst thing if he gets seized by the hair, punched in the face, stabbed by a knife, or gut checked by a sword pommel in the middle of (or slightly before) this bite going down. The protagonist needs to be mostly through the process of tearing by the time this antagonist realizes what’s happening. Even then, he’s in just the right range for some vicious retaliation. Even if he gets enough of a bite to kill, the other guy isn’t going to die right away. That could easily lead to an “I’m Taking You With Me” scenario.

The good news is that if he does manage a bite, he doesn’t need to take their windpipe. The human mouth is a vile, dirty, disgusting place and his victim will most likely die from either blood loss (depending on where he bites) or an infection.

The downside is his mouth will be full of their blood, and he’ll probably get sick too. If he doesn’t manage to escape, whoever else is working with his attacker will probably kill him because biting another human is as feral as it gets and automatically shifts whoever does it from “human being” into “animal”. While dehumanizing yourself to terrify your victims is a great strategy for psychological warfare, it doesn’t work so well when the shoe is on the other foot. In writing, you also run the risk of dehumanizing the character for the audience too. If it fails or the other guy lives, then he’s still the crazy idiot who tried to grab a guy’s throat with his teeth.

The trick to writing good fight scenes is being able to see and plan from the perspective of both parties in a fight. When trying to figure out whether something is possible never assume the guy they’re doing this action to is just going to stand there and take it. Everyone wants to live.

When talking about fighting, you’ve got to go through two steps. The first is the purely theoretical of “would it work?”, if the answer is maybe then ask “what would the other guy do in response?”

Most of the stupidest fighting ideas in real life die in this second stage (sometimes on the battlefield itself) because a live actor is much more difficult to deal with than lifeless dummy or someone whose given you permission to put your teeth around their throat. If the idea doesn’t float or sound good when pit against resistance then it’s usually no good, even if you’re crazy enough or desperate enough to try.

If rapid escalation into sudden, terrifying brutality isn’t in this character’s skill set (eye crushing, biting, and others) then this approach probably won’t work out for him. Does he think about ripping people’s throats with his teeth on a general basis? Has he ripped throats out before? Does he find the idea repulsive? If there’s a no to any of these questions or a yes to the last one then this approach may not be right for him.

Alternate approaches:

1) With only his head, shoulders, and feet, your protagonist could put his attacker on the ground and then crush his throat with their foot. It would take slightly longer, be less shocking, and require a finer grasp of tactics, but that’s possible.

This has the potential to be exciting. I understand, however, that it is very difficult for someone without a martial arts background to think with their feet or plan a fight scene around kicks or anything other than fists.

2) Ram their attacker and drive them both to the ground, and give their head a few solid hits with their forehead if they manage to land on top. Then run for it.

This one would be much easier to go with, though their chances of killing via this method are slim unless they manage to land a concussion or damage the brain some other way. However, it could provide them with a chance to make an exit if they can do enough damage so their attacker doesn’t try to stop them from escaping.

There’s also the risk of what the other guy does with his hands. However, the one who lands on top is usually in the best position.

3) The environment surrounding your character and where they are fighting can become a weapon they utilize in their escape.

This is often overlooked in fight scenes, but utilizing the environment and terrain is a huge factor in combat. There may be a way for your protagonist to kill their attacker sitting right next to them, or they can take advantage of.

Throwing your body weight around is something anyone can do because your utilizing your core and momentum to destabilize the enemy’s balance. This can be done with just your shoulder and feet planted in the right place. Knock ‘em into walls. Use this force to create new, creative means of attack and opportunities in the environment.

4) Stun this guy, duck past, and run for a crowded area to make his escape.

This is what it says on the tin.

5) Or wait and plan an escape later when he’s in a better position.

This may not work depending on what’s about to happen to him in prison. The best time for a prison break is not from the prison itself but while the prisoner is in transit. Try to remember, depending on the situation, your character needs to escape in a way that keeps his pursuers from following him. This doesn’t necessarily they have to die. (At least, in this exact moment.)

6) He tries it and fails.

He tries it, he fails, or might be mildly successful but not successful enough, gets caught and the situation plays out another way.
Sometimes, scenes don’t go the way we want but that doesn’t mean the
story ends. Another interesting path is waiting right around the corner.

7) You ignore all advice and just do it. YOLO.

Try it and see what happens.

-Michi

(I don’t know of this a question for you or @scriptmedic but I’m hoping you’ll be able to help a little) how effective is the carotid strike actually? Will it actually knock someone out and does it cause brain damage like other knockouts? Is there any way to block against it or lessen the effect? Thank you so much and am very grateful for your blog ))

If I’m bluntly honest, I’m not sure how you could strike the carotid artery in a way that would cut off the flow of blood long enough to render someone unconscious without also killing them.

If you’re deliberately cutting off the flow of blood to the brain by compressing the carotid, that would be a blood choke. As we’ve said before, those can turn lethal with shocking speed. But, I’m not seeing where a strike to the neck would temporarily block the flow of blood long enough to put someone under, without cutting off the flow long enough to kill them.

Assuming you managed to find a way to do this, you’d be dealing with the same problems associated with knocking someone out. You’re cutting off oxygen to the brain and hoping you get a very specific kind of brain damage. I mean, this is the problem here; you’re asking for a way to inflict brain damage without inflicting brain damage.

Even if you did manage to put someone down, as with chokes, you’re talking about the victim being unconscious for a few seconds. So, the value of doing so is fairly limited.

The martial arts I’m aware of that practice strikes to the neck, like Krav Maga, don’t particularly care if the victim survives. They’re more interested in decisively ending a threat and, generally speaking, the dead aren’t much of a threat.

There’s an irony here; you’re describing a kill strike that the victim might be able to accidentally survive. Not, the other way around.

Writers like to use knockouts as a “safe” alternative to killing someone. I’m as guilty of this as anyone. But, the reality is that being knocked unconscious is close enough to killing someone that you really can’t selectively inflict the desired outcome. Similarly, you can’t knock someone out for long periods of time, without inflicting severe brain damage. It can, and does happen, but you can’t choose that result.

Ultimately, this stuff comes from a desire to include, “safe” violence. I’m sorry. There is no such thing. No one who engages in violence has full control over the situation. Some people like to think they do, but they’re deluding themselves. You can have characters who try to do the Batman, “I control all the factors,” but without (some very specifically tuned) superpowers, they really don’t.

Attempting to knock someone out, by any means, means you’re taking on the very real risk that the victim will end up dead. That’s a potential outcome.

-Starke

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Im writing a character who is supposed to be an terrifyingly lethal fighter, so I’m wondering how it’s possible to kill someone without a weapon (other than snapping a neck)

I’m
tempted to be glib, and simply say that your character’s limbs and body are
weapons, but let’s start by turning this one around.

First,
snapping someone’s neck, the way you see in films, doesn’t work. You can annoy
someone, and rack up an attempted murder charge, but it doesn’t actually work.
That said, the list of things that can, in fact, kill someone is not short,
ranging from blood chokes (where the attacker holds their opponent in a
headlock which obstructs the carotid artery) to crushing the trachea, rupturing
the kidney (though this one will take awhile), or any number of other attacks
that will interrupt the victim’s ability to continue getting oxygen to their
brain.

So, go
back to that comment about your body being a weapon. It’s a concept that’s
pretty easy to dismiss as pseudo-mysticism; doing that is a mistake. The
important thing to take away from that phrase is the mindset. With enough
creativity and dedication, just about anything
can be a weapon. A character who’s willing to walk into a fight, grab their
opponent by the skull and ram them face first onto a chunk of rebar is using
weapons. They’re using their body and environment.

This is
also where the idea of a character using a weapon being limited comes from.
Again, it’s an idea that’s easy to dismiss as abstract philosophy, but it does
reflect a kind of thinking that people, including writers, can trap themselves
with. “I have a sword, therefore, I can…” as opposed to, “I have all these
options to turn my enemies into meat pudding.”

I
realize this isn’t, exactly, the catalogue of kill strikes you were hoping for.
If you’re looking for more discussion on brutality and it’s psychological
impact on combat, I would suggest you take a look at our The Only Unfair Fight
tag.

-Starke

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Are there actually such a thing as “dirty tricks” in fights? I mean, whatever makes you win, right?

Yeah, or at least sort of. Dirty tricks just mean you’re employing “dishonorable” methods to win. We’ve talked about honor in combat before, and we have an entire tag dedicated to the “only unfair fight is the one you loose” truism.

In case you didn’t follow either of those links, a quick short version is, a “dirty trick” is anything your opponent thinks is unfair. So… somewhat obviously, there’s a lot of potential for disagreements over what is, or isn’t, “dirty.”

Many people approach combat with the idea that there’s some kind of “honorable” way to comport yourself. Concepts like, “don’t strike your opponent in the genitals,” or “don’t shoot them in the back.” The historical basis for these concepts probably has a lot to do with historical European combat, where nobles were expected to participate directly, but were afforded special protections, and the rules of “honorable” combat evolved to reduce the risk of a peasant shock trooper accidentally waxing an opposing noble who could have been ransomed back after the battle.

Similarly deliberately maiming your opponent is also viewed as dirty. It’s not hard to guess that the origin is the same, though I have nothing to back up that suspicion. Some “dirty tricks” also simply fall under the heading of unsanitary. There’s many medical reasons you’d never want to tear a chunk out of someone with your teeth. Again, I’ve gone into this in a lot more detail in the past.

It’s probably worth remembering: Fights don’t occur in a discrete space away from the rest of your story, or your life. Sometimes, winning a fight by any means necessary is not worth it. The consequences of your decisions will follow you. You can win a fight by grabbing your foe’s head, and running your thumbs through their eye sockets, but you do need to step back and ask, “is this something you/your character can live with?”

-Starke

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Hey! I need a character to break a guy’s neck with her bare hands, but I’m well aware that the ease with which this is often done in movies is not realistic. That’s fine – I’m going for a pretty brutal kill anyway – and my character is physically powerful, vicious, and more than willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done. I had intended to have her pin the guy face-down with all her weight and wrench his head back from there – would that realistically do it? Any advice is welcome. :)

It would probably be easier to simply stomp on the victim at the base of the skull without even bending over. Breaking the neck with your hands is, almost always, a non-start. It might be possible to achieve the same result with a well placed hand strike, but that wouldn’t be nearly as brutal.

The other, arguably, more horrific option would be to run a screwdriver, icepick, or other similar tool through the base of the skull into the brainstem once they’re in that position. It’s not exactly the same as breaking their neck, but it’s certainly a brutal way to go.

In general, I’d recommend you check out our The Only Unfair Fight tag for more relevant ideas and concepts.

-Starke

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Why are techniques such as biting, scratching, pulling air, jabbing people in the eyes, and going for the groin considered underhanded or “fighting dirty”? They definitely hurt and they could buy you more time to escape…

Because they’re dishonorable. Phrased that way, it might sound kind of stupid, but that is the logic behind why these get treated the way they do. Another example would be shooting, or stabbing, someone in the back, or gouging out an eye.

Also, these techniques aren’t created equal. Some of them will legitimately end a fight, others will just annoy an attacker.

Tearing a chunk out of someone with your teeth is a very effective way to convince them not to mess with you. Biting has some serious social stigmas associated with it. Human bites are very dangerous. The bacteria in your mouth are a major health hazard to anyone you play Pacman on. This is before considering that you can deliver a lot of force with your teeth. Your mouth is designed for tearing apart meat, much like the meat found in your foe’s arm or neck.

Biting someone can kill them. It’s also not a great idea, because you’re exposing yourself directly to their blood. If they have a blood communicable disease, then there could be serious health implications for you in the future.

Scratching someone doesn’t really work. In most cases, it will annoy them, at best. Even with long nails, the only damage you’ll do is superficial. One rare exception is if you rake the eyes. But, honestly, targeting the eyes is another underhanded tactic.

Pulling hair is iffy. It gives you some control over the head (if you hold on.) Unfortunately it also puts you very close to your opponent, and if depending on their tolerance for pain, it ties up one of your hands for limited advantage. If you’re using their hair as a tool for bouncing their skull off a hard surface, then it is an option, but on its own, this does nothing but irritate your opponent.

Tagging someone in the groin will piss them off. Depending on the individual, it might not do much else. Pop culture will teach you that this is an instant off switch for any guy. Reality will sometimes shrug off the blow, and retaliate. It will hurt, but connecting with enough force to incapacitate is not a certainty.

A lot of our concepts about what is acceptable behavior in a fight is inherited from historical rules of engagement. Rules which were originally designed to prevent a medieval peasant from accidentally killing a noble instead of capturing them for ransom, still filter up to the surface today, in prohibitions about killing someone without seeing their face.

In very general terms, dirty fighting is anything that undermines the rules of “fair fight,” and the general idea that combat is about a direct physical contest between two opponents.

It’s important to understand that concepts like honor and dirty fighting are defined entirely social norms and values. Social norms dictate what is acceptable behavior in combat. There’s nothing intrinsic about any of these techniques that make them evil, or particularly underhanded, but our society says, “don’t do this, it’s beneath you.” So, it’s “dirty,” because social norms said so.

-Starke

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About the incapacitation without tying up – we did a self defense unit in physical education my sophomore year of high school. Our instructor told us that if somebody came after you that you could cut their Achilles. I think his point was no Achilles = no walking on that leg. Not sure what you’d consider this, but that’s another way to stop somebody, especially if you want to get away

Sounds like the work of the same sadist who ran my first self defense class.

Okay,
so, there is a strand of thought in the self defense community that
says, “if someone comes after you; you fuck them up.” Usually,
these guys are adults, teaching other adults, and that’s fine. It’s a
philosophical outlook. You decide to make absolutely sure your attacker stays down. As an adult, you’re expected to
be able to weigh the consequences of your actions, look at the situation
you’re in, and respond appropriately.

They teach you to ramp up
to 10, and trust you to know when not to. So that, some day, if you run
into someone that requires that kind of a response, you can go there
immediately.

…and then, sometimes, guys who come from that strand end up in a classroom full of kids and everything goes to hell.

This
is where my outlook on unarmed combat comes from, if anyone was
wondering. A Wyoming Sheriff’s Deputy who probably should not have been
tapped to teach teens self defense.

Severing the Achilles tendon
is one of those injuries that will not heal on their own. If I’m
remembering correctly, the specific result is, you
cannot properly control the angle of your foot without the tendon.
Practically, this means no walking, no kicking, no use of the leg for
anything useful. This is an injury that will require surgery and, up to a
year of recovery time. This is very serious. Not life threatening, but (if untreated) it is permanent.

It’s
also not an injury you’d expect to see in a normal self defense
environment. Severing the tendon requires getting a blade in there. This
requires a very low strike (in the literal sense), because the tendon
is almost at ground level. You’re also hoping they’re not wearing
footwear that protects the ankle. Any self defense plan that stops if
your opponent is wearing a pair of boots, has some issues.

Actually,
I should clarify, it’s not an injury you expect to see intentionally
inflicted in a self defense situation. This does happen as a sports
injury, so this is something common enough that any doctor with a
history of dealing with sports medicine should know what to do. It is
also an injury that can occur when teaching martial arts. Not because
someone cut it, but because they misjudged a technique and tore their
own.

There is a related sword technique called hamstringing, where you cut the tendons at the back of the knee. Same basic result, except it’s their shin they can’t control, not their foot. Nasty, a little tricky to execute, but it does what it says. You’re slightly more likely to have a chance to go after that in a self defense situation, especially since very few people wear any armor there, but I still wouldn’t recommend it, because it’s exceedingly disproportionate.

Here’s the thing about this kind of self defense; It assumes you’ll use it in situations where the alternative is dying. Literally, if you didn’t do this, your attacker would have killed you, and you had no lesser option to save yourself.

Within that range, going after the Achilles tendon is kind of an odd choice. It’s not an easy target to nail. If you’re in some situation where it is available, and those kinds of extreme tactics are appropriate, then, sure. But there are far safer, and easier to exploit, options.

-Starke

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Considering that humans can deliver a bite strong enough to sever a finger, how effective would a bite be against an assailant trying to put you in a headlock? Would biting the arm be enough to make them let go?

Assuming the arm was in a position you could get to? Yes. Given a little time and the inclination, you can completely destroy someone’s arm (or, really, just about any body part,) with your teeth. The difficult part isn’t biting chunks out of someone’s arm, it’s being willing to bite chunks out of someone’s arm.

Think of it this way; your teeth are there to remove meat from bone, and they’re actually pretty good at doing it. On top of that, humans are one of the worst kinds of bites to receive. We build up some really nasty bacterial colonies in our mouths, and applying them to an open wound is a recipe for infection. Our immune systems (usually) recognize and know how to handle our own colonies. But, those are unique to an individual, so if you’re bitten by someone else, there’s no immunity, and the results are very unpleasant.

The hard part here is actually being willing to chow down on someone else. There’s a lot of social and psychological conditioning telling you not to bite fellow human beings.

The thing is, that conditioning is there to protect you. Exposure to blood is a fantastic vector for all kinds of illnesses that are otherwise non-transmittable. Some forms of viral Hepatitis and HIV are the big ticket items here; but, given the choice, there are many reasons to never touch a random stranger’s blood, much less gargle it.

So, you need to be willing to actually push past your own self preservation instincts, which is much harder than it sounds.

You also need to be willing to commit to seriously injuring your opponent. That’s a much easier threshold to hit, but combining it with the ability to shuck self preservation to mangle your opponent creates a weird paradox.

There’s a strand of combat philosophy that advocates rapid brutal escalation. Literally, “the best defense is a good offense.” You can see elements of this in a lot of the armed self defense forms. The problem is, outside of very extreme circumstances, biting someone takes the defense part of that equation out at the knees. You’re not using rapid escalation to protect yourself from attack, because you’re exposing yourself to far more potential harm now.

Now, obviously, you can end up with characters that have no problem taking out someone else’s throat with their teeth. But, that’s a rather singular kind of brutality. I did talk about the combat applications of brutality awhile back. So, that might be worth reading, if you haven’t seen it.

-Starke

I’m writing a character that’s a professional dancer. I read your post about not being able to be masters in both dance AND martial arts, but is it possible for him to be good /enough/ to take down a couple of other guys with the use of his agility and possibly weapons, as well?

I’m going to sound like a broken record here, I know. Dancing doesn’t help. Asking again won’t change that. It’s like asking, “how does my day job as a pasta chef help me fight crime?” These things are completely unrelated. I know, with dancing it doesn’t seem like they are, but trust me, they have nothing to do with one another.

The only martial artists that benefit from dancing are exhibition artists. These are the performers that put on the floor shows. For them, acrobatics, gymnastics, and dance routines are nice supplements that allow them to spice up their routines, and they make it look good.

But, looking good, and being effective in a fight are completely different animals.

If you try to use dance moves in a fight it will get you killed.

Second: taking multiple fighters is seriously hard. The upper human limit is six to eight opponents at one time. The upper limit. If you are Batman, you can take eight. If you’re someone that actually ages, and hasn’t been getting into random slap fights with a menagerie of bizarrely themed villains for 80 years with a history of beating the snot out of gods and winning, taking on groups is basically not happening.

Also, I hate to break it to you, Batman, Chuck Norris, and Buffy cheat, in a lot of ways. TV and film presents multiple combat as far easier than it actually is because it wants you to see how utterly badass the hero is. Unfortunately, if that’s your baseline, it completely messes up your zero point. Taking two guys is hard. Juggling three or four requires a phenomenal amount of skill. Handling six is the realistic limit for someone with decades of combat training and experience.

Now, if it’s seven of you, and you’re exhibitionists who are putting on a martial arts floor show, or stunt performers choreographing a major fight for that movie you’re in… but that’s not a real fight. I’m sure it will look cool, but that’s not how combat actually works.

There is one major caveat with this: weapons change everything. If you’re willing to start a fight by burying a crowbar in the back of some mook’s skull, dealing with three two opponents is quite possible. If you’re willing to leverage one against another, or tangle them up in each other, or just flat out kill them before they can respond, you can deal with two opponents. But, even with a weapon, this is tricky, and you’re going to need a plan. The weapon just makes it possible. That said, if your opponents also have weapons, you’re back where you started, and the odds of you living through the fight just got a lot lower.

-Starke

Can you do an article on 1 vrs group fights. and the techniques people use and how to actually win them. So far all I hear is that I master can with great difficulty fight off a group but nothing on how. I feel this is an area that there is very little info about.

You’re in luck…

Also, no guarantee these are in the correct order. I’ve been using google to hunt them up, so it’s been a little scatter shot, and I might have missed something.

Fight Scene Strategies: The Individual Versus Group

There was also this ask chain… Which resulted in a lot of information over a couple days.

April 5th (Initial Question)

April 5th (Followup – Tactical Mindset)

April 6th (Followup – Excessive Force, Psychological Warfare, and Combat Nietzsche)

I referenced The Only Unfair Fight is the One You Lose articles here, you can follow the tag, or find Part 1 here, and Part 2 here.

Someone in the comments for one of those suggested looking at Skyrim and Dragon Age: Origins for insights into fighting groups, which is actually a terrible suggestion. I love both games in their own way, however they’re anything but realistic.

For Skyrim, it’s important to remember that the player character is explicitly a superhero. You see this most with the shout mechanic, but there are a ton of minor points scattered through the game where someone who’s familiar with the setting will realize magic just doesn’t affect the player character properly. As a fantasy superhero simulator it’s entertaining enough, but, as I said, it’s not a realistic depiction of combat.

As much as Bioware wants it to be an RPG, Dragon Age: Origins is a strategy game. I have a lot of nitpicks on inconsistencies in the setting (without including DA2), but even as much as they tweaked it from Neverwinter Nights, the combat is still a turn based strategy game playing out in real time. Or, in other words, not how combat works.

A little off topic, but there was an unrelated ask about angry mobs from December here.

-Starke