Tag Archives: the spear is the advanced version of the staff

Same anon* Also spears… I’m writing a fantasy story, and I’m getting most of the other weapons down, but the spear is aggravating me and how it should be used. This ask is slightly more important x)

We’re doing a post on the bow for another anon. We’ll be putting that one up tomorrow. The twin daggers? You might have to content yourself with general knife fighting when doing your research, we can do a post on that. But to start with, I really recommend taking a look at Michael Janich’s videos Stay Safe Media over on YouTube. He talks Self-Defense training, but his style is focused on defending yourself with a knife and what you can do with it. It’s helpful because if you are starting with nothing, it can be a difficult weapon to grasp.

The spear is actually pretty easy once you get the hang of it. It was a very common weapon among troops during the medieval period because 1) it was easier for the pole men to learn than a sword or a bow, swords were more of a status symbol anyway in both Europe and Japan. 2) It was exceptionally useful for taking on cavalry. The Greeks, the Romans, and the Chinese all made good use of the spear and their styles are all pretty different. Also, keep in mind that spears are cheaper to mass produce than a sword because of the higher wood to metal ratio.

So, how do you work with a spear? Start by studying up on basic staff fighting (none-pointy end variety), staff fighting and spear fighting are essentially the same thing because it’s the same weapon with a tip added on the end. I say this because when we stop and look at staff fighting, it’ll give you a better idea of the spear’s defensive capabilities as well as it’s offensive.

Here are some basic strikes:

The basic staff strikes create an X in front of the body. The first strike goes high to the temple or the neck with the top part of the staff, the second strikes low to the thigh or the knee, now the top of the spear is back beside it’s user’s face, it’s come across the body. The top beside the face, now strikes downwards to the opponent’s other thigh, switching the position of the hands, the character strikes again with the bottom part of the spear to the other side of the face or neck. Then, they reset and start all over again.

The other three are: straight forward into the gut or chest (where the spear aspect becomes relevant), straight downwards from above to the head, or flipping the bottom of the staff up to strike between the legs to the groin region.

The staff can be difficult for writers to grasp because it’s a dynamic weapon that strikes with both ends as easily as it defends and there aren’t a lot of good examples of staff/spear in fiction compared to the other more (not really) flashy (romantic) weapons.

I have some basic training in both basic staff and Wushu styles. This is why I recommend sticking with basic European styles before trying the swirly ones, they’re a little more complicated and harder to pull off in a fiction context.

A good source to turn to for examples in fiction is:

The Protector of the Small series by Tamora Pierce. She goes into a great deal of information on the staff as a basic weapon with her protagonist preferring it as a primary. It has the added bonus of training sequences too, which will help you with things to think about.

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland for the fight sequence between Little John and Robin Hood on the bridge.

-Michi