Tag Archives: writing monsters

Q&A: Monster Hunting

If beheading was the surefire way to kill a monster (say, a vampire or a changeling) what kind of weapon would be preferable in a modern setting? I was thinking of something like an axe or a tomahawk, but would they be better than, say, a short sword?

In a modern setting? My first thought would be a 12 Gauge bolo shell. These are a pair of 12-15mm slugs connected by a metal wire. When fired, the slugs will begin orbiting one another, and the resulting projectile will cut through soft objects, like small trees, trash cans, car doors, and human bodies with relative ease.

There’s a simple problem here. If your monsters are superhuman, going into melee with them is a death sentence for an unmodified human. This is especially true if your monsters are significantly faster than normal, though superhuman strength that allows them to simply rip limbs off will quickly disarm your swordsman, no matter how good they are.

“Safely” dealing with monsters requires that you step back, evaluate your options, and pick the best tools for the job. With rare exceptions, that’s not going to be a sword. They may use a fireaxe to finish the job on a downed monster, but putting those things down will be much safer at range.

If your monster hunters have access to military grade hardware (and can use them without drawing heavy police scrutiny), then an excellent option would be FRAG-12 shells. These are a grenade round designed to load into a 12 gauge shotgun, and should be able to spread your unsuspecting vampire all over the walls.

If your monsters have particular weaknesses, then finding a way to deliver those at range will be far safer. For example: silver bullets are a real thing. They don’t make for fantastic rifle rounds, because the weight is lower than lead, impairing the ballistics, but if you need silver to get the job done, a handgun is a legitimate option.

Explosive and incendiary options can be delivered precisely, and at range. This can be anything from a Dragon’s Breath shotgun shell, which ejects flaming metals (specifically, highly reactive metals which ignite on contact with the atmosphere), or flare shells, to home-made explosive handgun rounds. (For example: Adding a fulminated mercury payload to a hollow-point round, which is an incredibly dangerous, but quite real, option.)

Hell, against a monster that’s unusually light sensitive, just chucking a flash bang in could seriously mess them up.

So far as it goes, a simple 12 gauge pump action shotgun, may be able to down a monster, giving your characters time to take its head off. Though, that is an inherently risky strategy, because they don’t know exactly how long it will stay down, and will need to get within arm’s reach.

There’s a slight difference here, between monsters and normal opponents: Humans, when presented with gunfire, will die. Monsters, particularly something that’s undead, may not. The basic idea behind a bullet is you’ll poke holes in something and let it bleed to death. If they thing you’re shooting can’t die from bleeding, there’s a real possibility that shooting them won’t get the job done. Makes sense. Except, that’s not the same thing as being immune to gunfire. A bullet that strikes bone will still break it. Shooting a vampire in the head may not kill it, but hosing one down with automatic rifle fire should still mess it up enough to put it down, at least for a few minutes (if not longer).

Incidentally, if you’re working with the idea of monsters that are, literally, fast enough to dodge bullets, long range rifle fire is your friend. Firing at ranges where the sound will not reach your monster before the bullet means they won’t know to dodge it. For example: A .50 HEAP round should be able to debone your monster from the next zip code over. Again, as above, this is military hardware, and the original intent for HEAP rounds were disabling vehicles and aircraft, but vampires are generally a lot less threatening when they’ve already been disassembled for easy storage.

As I mentioned earlier, for decapitation of a downed opponent in a modern setting, my money’s on a fire axe.  It’s nice, large, heavy enough to get the job done, and common enough that your characters could potentially grab one on the scene. If your characters aren’t squeamish, a sledgehammer to the skull may also finish the job (depending on your monster).

So, I’ve been talking about high end hardware, for the most part. If your monster hunters have the backing of some group that can kit them out. If your characters are just people off the street, faced with monsters, and have no protections, things can get a lot dicier. Dealing with cosmic horror, when you can potentially call in an air strike, is a lot less threatening, than when you’re dealing with the idea that your neighbor has come back from the grave, and is preying on your family.

If your setting is one where your monster hunters are just, “normal,” people, then picking your tools becomes more important, but you also have way less options, and anything they do will draw police attention. Luring a monster into an abandoned building, and setting fire to the place may kill it, but that’s also a good way to get arrested. Meanwhile, things like HEAP rounds, FRAG-12s, and FNX-45s loaded with Silver Bullets are way outside your budget.

If that’s the situation your characters are in, things like fire axes, or maybe an old 1911 are options, but if your characters have normal considerations, spending $30 a round, to load that .45 with silver is probably not a realistic option.

For writing this kind of desperate, street level monster hunter, one of my favorite reference sources is still Hunter: The Reckoning. There’s also some good advice on story-building mixed in, and the old World of Darkness remains an excellent urban fantasy setting, with a lot of moving pieces.

For government funded monster hunters (specifically vampires), Ultraviolet (the British TV series, unrelated to the 2006 American film of the same name) is an excellent examination of how modern technology can intersect with the supernatural. (Also, the first place I ran across Idris Elba.)

Regardless your approach, the best options for dealing with monsters in a modern setting are going to be getting creative with modern technologies. This may be as simple as tazering a werewolf, or chucking Molotov cocktails at a vampire.

-Starke

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Q&A: Setting the Rules in Horror

One thing that always bugs me about ghost stories is how there doesn’t seem to be any consistency In how a Ghost operates. Theyre built up as scary only to have them be really incompetent. There’s this particular case in IT. Where one of the kids gets grabbed by Pennywise then just wrestles out and runs away. It makes Pennywise seem really incompetent. Other ghost stories do this. Where the ghost can hurt you. . . except when it cant. No logic behind it. How can a writer avoid this?

The short answer is: By making sure there are logical rules underpinning your setting. With horror this is a little harder than it seems, but I’ll get into that in a moment.

Start by writing up the rules for the monsters in your setting. How are they created? What are their powers and limitations? What do they want? How do they go about getting that?

To an extent, this is something you should probably do anyway, if you’re creating an elaborate setting. But, it can be especially helpful if you’re dealing with monsters, or other fantasy creatures.

Exactly how you format this is, obviously, up to you. There’s no strict list of things you need. If you’ve got multiple kinds of monsters, the document doesn’t even need to be uniform between them.

Also, if anyone’s wondering, there is no “One True Set of Rules for Ghosts,” or any other kind of monster. There’s a lot of variety in folklore, which gets even more diverse when you start taking other cultures into account. When you’re creating a monster, either from scratch or from some basic template, like a ghost, you have a lot of latitude to decide how they work in your story.

Once you have those rules, keep them with you when you write. Depending on how large it is, and how you work, you may want to physically tape it to your wall, or you might simply keep them open in another window while you’re typing on your computer. It doesn’t matter where the document is, just make sure you keep that stuff close and accessible.

So, I said this is a little harder with horror. Most horror, as a genre, thrives on fear of the unknown. Once you’ve taken the rules for a horror setting, dragged them out in the open, and poked them with a stick, the illusion collapses, and much of the fear escapes. If you want to scare someone, you need their imagination to do the work for you.

This means, you do not want to put those rules out in the open for your audience. Even in a normal setting, you’ll probably want to hold back a bit, and spool those out over time, as your characters learn, and discover new information. But, with horror, hiding those rules, while still clearly enforcing them is a difficult, but vital, skill to master.

There’s an important detail here. Even if you clearly infer a rule in your horror, so long as you don’t go out and explicitly define it, there’s going to be a degree of unease. Horror thrives on that space, where you should be safe, but you’re not completely sure.

The other set of rules you should keep in mind, are the ones your characters create for the monster. If it’s trying to kill them, they’re going to be trying to figure out how to avoid that. Looking for what the monster’s limits are, and trying to identify its methodology. After all, if they know that it can’t kill them under certain circumstances, then they’ll want to find a way to engineer that situation.

The thing about your characters is that they can be wrong. They can look at the information available, and make an entirely rational but incorrect assumption. This can create situations where the monster is suddenly able to “break the rules,” because the rules your characters worked out aren’t the real limitations you set at the beginning. This should send your characters back to the drawing board, looking for something they got wrong.

Now, obviously, if your character is a veteran monster hunter, then they’ll probably have a pretty good idea of what the rules are. Though, even with that, there’s a lot of room for a character to prepare for the wrong monster. To be fair, this kind of character doesn’t usually work well in horror. It’s not a hard, “no,” but it does make your life more difficult. This is because they’re likely to have a (mostly) accurate version of your rules internalized. Point of view characters like this can work, but it requires you to be a lot more creative. If you think you’re up to it, feel free to experiment. However, stories with characters like this will often trend more into supernatural action rather than horror.

One more vitally important thing: Don’t pull your punches. Not in horror. If there’s a monster out there in the forest trying to kill them, and it gets the opportunity to pick someone off, kill them. The only time I’d caution against this is if you’re late in the story and running out of characters to snuff. In those cases, I’d suggest stepping back a scene or two, and figuring out how to keep them alive by avoiding that situation entirely.

Even then, I’d still recommend you roll with a death, even if its your designated protagonist. As a genre, horror is an indiscriminate killer. The story will survive your favorites dying. Also, sometimes, the monster wins, and your story ends with the last survivor down. That’s okay. It’s far better than a situation where your monster loses credibility because it fumbles a kill. If you find the story really doesn’t work without them, then that’s what rewrites are for.

I should add, I’ve been approaching this from the perspective of a story where the monster is trying to kill the protagonists, but this isn’t a certainty. Sometimes in horror, the monster doesn’t want to kill your characters. If it wants something else from them, that can be even more horrifying. Another possibility worth mentioning is, sometimes you’ve got monsters that honestly do not care about your characters at all. They’re content to go about their business, oblivious to the damage they cause.

-Starke

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