Tag Archives: background

Q&A: This Will not be on the Test

I was wondering what are the standard teachings that comes with fighting? I mean, what else do you learn? You seem knowledgeable about medical stuff. Is it your merit or do people get taught about those along with their education etc.

There isn’t a single, “standard,” here. Martial arts classes will teach you whatever the instructor feels is relevant to your training. If they think you need anatomical knowledge, they’ll teach you that. If they think you’ll need to learn about human behavior and psychology, they’ll cover that instead.

So, with that said, I didn’t learn this in martial arts. My medical training, such as it is, comes from two sources.

First, I’m an Eagle Scout, including some limited medical training. I don’t remember how many medically related badges I have. At least two, probably more.

The second source is more informal. I was raised by a clinical pharmacologist, and a Methodist Minister who decided he wanted to become an EMT after a midlife crisis. While we’re not close, I also have a brother who’s an MD. The short version is, I grew up with an unusual amount of medical information getting thrown around, and picked up some more along the way..

My exposure to medical ethics came from psychology classes I took in college. It’s the only field where I maintained a perfect 4.0.

So, as I say in the tags on every medical post, I’m not a doctor. I can render first aid and that’s close to the end what I’m willing to do to another person. However, I have enough knowledge that I can offer advice from a writing perspective. Also, because of the informal background, I rarely have issues understanding online resources.

My formal education is, I have an associates in Computer Programming, and a Bachelors in Political Science, along the way I ended up 3 or 6 credits short of a minor in Psychology. Yes, that’s a weird educational path, and no it’s not a medical background.

Scouts included some medical training. Now, anyone who sticks with scouts will get some basic first aid training, however I also went back for merit badges on the subject, so my medical training was more extensive.

If anyone’s wondering, “how could you have forgotten which badges you earned?” I have over 40, I could not give you a list from memory if you put a gun to my head. I can’t even remember the names for all of them looking at my sash.

One of my self defense classes, the one in the late 90s, was explicitly from the Boy Scouts. The Scout Master was a Captain in the Air Force, he grabbed a Sheriff’s Deputy he knew and put the entire Troop through a couple weeks of training. Ironically, this was the least responsible round of training, as it prioritized the hand to hand component rather than focusing on situational awareness, threat assessment, creating an opening and extracting.

If you want to learn medicine, go to school for it. There’s certainly a need for medical professionals in the world. Just, be aware that it’s a very unglamorous profession.

If you want to learn martial arts, take a course. You can do both, unless you’re in your residency.

In general, a well run class (of any kind) will include the information you need to understand the material presented. (Or, in academia, will have published prerequisites.) There are definitely martial arts classes out there where you’ll learn a bit of A&P along the way. I probably learned some anatomy from martial arts and simply didn’t realize it. However, you’re not going to get medical training from enrolling in a martial arts class.

-Starke

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Q&A: Starke is not a Real Doctor

Starke, as you have reminded us on 24 occasions, you are not a doctor. How then did you manage to build up such a large amount of medical knowledge?

Scouts, family, and research.

I’ll snark on the subject occasionally, but the Boy Scouts do actually force you to learn some intermediate first aid procedures. It never gets into the range of full field surgery, but there’s actually a lot of training that goes into reaching Eagle. Medical, and otherwise. Some basic stuff comes straight from that.

Second, there’s a stupid number of medical professionals in my immediate family. My mother taught pharmacology and substance abuse (diagnosis and treatment) for most of my life growing up, and a lot of that rubbed off. It’s also part of why I have a more solid grasp of drug interactions and effects than basic A&P.

My father was a certified EMT for a few years, and, while less of that rubbed off, he was also one of the people responsible for handling the first aid classes in Scouts, which meant it ended up more advanced than was probably strictly necessary, by the book. My oldest brother is an actual doctor, and, while I’ve never lived with him, I did have the misfortune of being stuck at the table during extensive discussions about his work. Forensic radiology, and later emergency radiology, if anyone’s wondering. Also, as with my father, he’s an Eagle Scout as well, which gets towards the slightly skewed perspective I have of thinking, that the rank, and associated skills aren’t that unusual. Even when they are.

Finally? Research. This is one that’s, technically, open to anyone. It depends on exactly what the question is, but with some stuff, like the intracardiac injection question yesterday, or the malnourished teenager question a while back, I just need to look it up and check. There’s a couple decent medical resources online. WebMD comes to mind, though honestly I use google on the term, and then sort through the responses based on where it’s coming from. The other thing about researching basic medical information is, this stuff is really well documented. It’s not always as accessible as medical professionals think it is. But, it is out there.

Part of the reason for the disclaimer is, since I’ve never had the full range of training, I want that out there. I’m doing the best I can, but it’s not technically my area of expertise, even though I’ve had to learn a lot on the subject.

-Starke