what about war scythes though?

We’ve talked about war scythes before, they’re in the same tag.

War scythes and scythes are completely different. While one may be converted from the other and refashioned, only the war scythe is a weapon designed for warfare. The other is an agricultural tool. The war scythe looks more like the average bladed polearm and functions in a similar manner. It does not, really, look like the Grim Reaper scythe.

The war scythe has been used during various peasant rebellions in Europe, particularly Eastern Europe, but that was a choice made because of their availability instead of their efficacy. When you’re a farmer, you go with what you have. Longarms/polearms do give a combatant with no training an advantage in combat. Polearms are a base choice and they are a good one. I’ll take a broom over a can of mace as a self-defense weapon. Flip the broom end around and it’s a makeshift staff.

Still, it’s not going to be a “first choice” kind of weapon. It’s in the category of “I have almost nothing else, so this will do”.

If you’re looking for a Grim Reaper version of a battle scythe, you won’t find one. At least, you won’t see it being used conventionally. There are weird pockets that pop up for almost everything, but just because something exists doesn’t mean it’s automatically going to be useful or comparable.

We have an affection for scythes due to the Grim Reaper’s popularity. Try to remember that the Grim Reaper is fictional and the “weapon” is an agricultural implement. It represents harvesting rather than murder and depicts the inevitability of death in relation to the seasons. As a mythological figure, the Grim Reaper is a force of nature. He’s/she’s/it’s not a monster you battle. At least, not in any conventional way.

I understand why this can be confusing.

-Michi

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