Q&A: Laser Sights

You said real snipers wouldn’t use a laser pointer with a rifle. Because it’s useless on great distance and you don’t want to announce yourself to your target. So what are laser pointers on guns good for? Because obviously they exist, but what for? Thanks for your blog, it’s very interesting and helpful!

Lasers are intended for short range target acquisition. That is to say, knowing exactly where you’re pointing the gun. They can be a useful aid for inexperienced shooters, though anything that speeds up your ability to put a bullet into someone is an advantage in a firefight. This is the same basic idea that makes reflex sights useful. It gives you a clean aim-point, and if that shaves a fraction of a second of your reaction time, it may save your life.

Of the two, reflex sights do the job slightly better, with less visual noise and without announcing that you’re about to shoot someone. Okay, the, “slightly better,” part is personal preference. If you really want, you can take the belt and suspenders approach and slap both of them on your gun, but you’re only going to be using one of them at any given moment.

Part of the reason I’ve said lasers are for amateurs is because, in most cases, if you’re sighting your weapon properly, you usually won’t see the laser. The front post will obstruct it for your dominant eye. (Your off eye will see it, but it’s just going to confirm what you already know.) If you’re sighting down the gun incorrectly, or not looking through the sights at all, then the laser will help your aim.

For an inexperienced shooter, in a crisis, a laser will help them put the round where they want it. For someone who knows what they’re doing, a laser is a much more situational tool, and not something they’ll need most of the time.

The major benefit for an experienced shooting is snapshots. This is where you rapidly bring the weapon up and fire without taking the time to aim properly. In this case, the shooter will probably be sighting incorrectly for speed, and the laser can give them a clear idea of what they’ll hit without actually needing the sights to verifying. To be fair, this is another thing you can use a reflex sight for. You can also snapshoot without either.

Finally, lasers can make switching between targets faster. Again, it lets you know where you’re aiming slightly faster than iron sights. Strictly speaking, lasers are also more forgiving as a sighting element than most optics. Even if you’re holding the gun incorrectly, the laser will tell you where you’ve pointed it.

The takeaway is that, lasers can be useful for shooting people in the same room, especially if you don’t really know your way around a gun. Not so much when you’re trying to put a round in someone half a block away.

-Starke

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